Kevux Systems
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About
Turtle Kevux is a Linux system based on gnu software and a linux kernel, all compiled with uclibc instead of the more common glibc.
It is not fhs or lsb compatible, which is seen as one of the many security enhancements.
It provides numerous space efficient packages available today.
It forms a complete but different system to Windows, Mac OS, Solaris, Bsd, or Linux.
Turtle Kevux is closest to Linux.
This system partially implements the Featureless Linux Library.

Mailing Lists
The following public mailing lists are available:

History
The Turtle Kevux distribution was originally started with Linux From Scratch.

The more and more I began deviating from their designs, the less and less it became Linux and slowly began turning into something entirely new. While I was custom rolling my own distribution, I was participating in a local linux users group (lclinux.org). From there, I was noticed and hired by one of the members of that lug to "custom roll" servers for McNeese State University's Academic Computing Center. This had given me the chance to test the distribution, in which I was building on my own time, in a real world scenario. As soon as I completed a given server, I was assigned to custom roll yet another. This allowed for even more experiments in the design of my distribution. At this time, it was called SALFS or Slightly Automated Linux From Scratch, given that my systems was based off of what I've learned from LFS.

After creating so many different systems, the size of the system had grown huge, in my opinion. With around 6-Gigabytes of space required by the system. In addition to that, I had started switching to the 2.6 kernel from the ever so stable 2.4 kernel. Then the final blow got me, I was tired of having so many different and unorganized ways in which all of the servers store and use data, as well as the security issues that arise from a system with 6 Gigabytes of data.

So, my first step was to figure out how to fix all of this as efficiently as possible. I began putting together a new system design around a new libc. This new design was to be called Turtle Linux; however, not long after I started these design, the local lug (lclinux.org) decided on their own that my system should not be called Linux, but instead Kevux. I by no means refused the name, in fact, I grabbed three domain names: kevux.org, kevux.net, and kevux.com.

First of all, Linux is an operating system, and I have no intentions of ever writing one myself (from scratch at least). I then considered what it was that people called Linux. What is called Linux today by the masses is not, in fact, the kernel itself (operating system), but instead the functionality that is expected, in addition to the operating system. After discussing this with a few people in the community, by simply calling this Kevux, it may be seen by some as not Linux. The Linux and Kevux will both use the Linux kernel, so I have come back and renamed this to Kevux Linux Systems.

A Kevux system has no intentions of having a "Linux" feel, a "windows" feel, a "Macintosh" feel, or whatever other OS there might be out there. The goal of this system is to simplify the structure of the entire system, reduce the size of all code on the system, allow for both users and programs to easily parse data, and to allow for a user to completely change how the system is and works to how they want the system to work, no matter how bizarre, outrageous, or stupid the idea may be.